Friday, June 12, 2015

NUTS ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEART AND ALSO REDUCE PREMATURE DEATH




I miss this study until I heard it discussed on BBC last night. This is a simple study, prospective cohort study, published in the latest edition of International Journal of Epidemiology.
Prof Piet Van den Brandt from the University of Mastricht looked into the daily consumption of nuts  of various types, and followed the subjects for 10 years to see the outcome after 10 years. They studied 120,000 subjects aged 55-69 years starting in 1986. They reviewed these same individuals after 10 years and see their condition. They found that after 10 years, those who consumed 15 gms of nuts daily had a 23% reduced risk of dying. There was also a 45% reduction in neurodegenerative disease, 39% reduction in respiratory diseases, and 30% reduction in incidence of diabetes.
Interesting.
This is the second large study to show this. If you remember, back in Nov 2013, the NEJM also published another large study done by the researchers in Harvard which showed essentially the same.
The fact that eating nuts ( part of the DASH diet ), reduces CAD is not in doubt.
Looks lie eating nuts is good for us. 15 gms is not much, probably a handful only, and yet over 10 years can have such a major impact. Note that this does not apply to peanut butter as that contains too much salt and transfat ( thats what they thing ).
Lets go for it.

2 comments:

Winston Yap said...

Doc, I understand that peanut butter made from peanuts contains both good as well as bad fats.
As far as the salt is concerned, it seems that it affects different people in different ways; some may be worse than others.
Perhaps taking about two teaspoons daily spread over two pieces of bread would be considered as moderate and safe consumption?
What's your take?
Thank you.
Regards,

hmatter said...

Hi Winston, I am sorry, but I think the data does point to the fact that peanut butter is not good for CV health. I am particularly concerned about the transfat in peanut butter. The salt is also an issue, although some race are more prone than others.